COVID-19 Guide

In these unprecedented times, all of us have had to make decisions with little information pertaining to COVID-19.  Referencing a number of resources (mainly the CDC and Dane County Public Health website), TPCHR has developed this interactive tool to better equip employees and managers to handle decisions related to COVID-19 health concerns and issues.  This tool is NOT intended to provide medical or legal advice.  It should be considered informational only.  Any medical or legal advice should come from a licensed professional.  Likewise, this decision guide should not be considered “the” definitive answer to any particular situation.  Each situation should be evaluated, and course of action based on individual circumstances.

Toggle between either option below to select the statement that best represents your situation as it pertains to this interactive decision-making guide.

Definitions

Sore throat; nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; chills; muscle pain; extreme fatigue/feeling very tired; new severe/very bad headache; new nasal congestion/stuffy or runny nose.

Fever of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher; new cough or a cough that gets worse; difficulty/hard time breathing; new loss of taste or smell.

To separate a sick person with COVID-19 from people who are not sick. People can end isolation when the following criteria are met: They have been fever-free for 24 hours (without the use of fever reducing medications) Their other symptoms have improved It has been at least 10 days since their symptom onset.

To separate and restrict the movement of a person who was exposed to COVID-19 in case they become sick. Most people start their quarantine when they find out about their exposure and can end their quarantine 14 days after the last time they were with the person with COVID-19.

Someone who was within 6 feet of a COVID-19 positive person (regardless of wearing a mask or other PPE) for at least 15 cumulative minutes Keep in mind the minutes of close contact add up; being within six feet for three, 5-minute periods would make someone a close contact. Can occur starting 2 days before positive test or illness onset, whichever occurred first

Quick Answers

The advice we've found is that you will stay home until test results are received. Refer to  "Quick Answers" below once test results are received. 

From what we've read, you should stay home until all of the following apply:

  1. You have been fever-free for 24 hours (without the use of fever reducing medications)
  2. Your other symptoms have improved.
  3. It has been at least 10 days since your symptom onset. A doctor's note or Public Health release is not required to return to work.

The advice we've seen id that you need to stay home and monitor for symptoms. If you have no symptoms, you can return 10 days after you were tested.

If during the 10 days you become symptomatic, then you must continue to stay home for at least 10 more days from the date of the symptom onset and meet all the following before returning to work

  1. You have been fever-free for 24 hours (without the use of fever reducing medications)
  2. Your other symptoms have improved.
  3. It has been at least 10 days since your symptom onset. A doctor's note or Public Health release is not required to return to work.

You do not have COVID-19.

You should follow standard employee illness protocols for returning to work, such as 24 hours fever-free, or 2 days after last episode of vomiting or diarrhea, or when on antibiotics for at least 24 hours, or as approved to work by a doctor. A doctor’s note may be required to return to work based on medical condition and business illness policy.